Assent vs. Ascent – Homophones: Love the

Assent vs. Ascent – Homophones: Love them or hate them, they’re everywhere. These two are a great example. They may sound the same, but their meanings couldn’t be any more different. Assent is a word that indicates agreement or approval. Ascent refers to an upward movement. Assent As a verb, assent means to agree or to give in. When used as a verb, it’s often followed by the word to. An example of this can be found in Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw: “She appeared t… http://ow.ly/kj8f509EgW7

What Are You Doing, Action Verb? – Actio

What Are You Doing, Action Verb? – Action verbs are typically single words that describe what a person or thing in a sentence does (like run, write, yell, and think). So if it answers the question What is the subject doing? it’s the action verb. In the sentence “John paints the garage,” the subject is John. To find the action verb, ask yourself What is John doing? John paints, so the action verb is paints. Action Verbs and Linking Verbs Linking verbs are verbs that link… http://ow.ly/fKss509D7Sn

Hail To The Chief: The Origination Of Pr

Hail To The Chief: The Origination Of Presidents’ Day – If you live in the United States, you might have a Monday in February off (unless you work retail). That special Monday is Presidents’ Day! But you might be interested to know that the Presidents’ Day holiday isn’t the official name of the holiday at all, and some states customize the day, too. The Uniform Monday Holiday Act The day was originally established in 1885 to honor the birthday of our first president, Ge… http://ow.ly/Si8s509Bzte

And Now…Transition Words! – Good transit

And Now…Transition Words! – Good transitions connect one sentence or paragraph to the next. A word, phrase, or sentence can serve as a transition to help make a shift in relationship, space, or time. Transitions connect ideas and supporting examples. They signal the coming of additional information or a conclusion. Transitions in Relationship Some transition words and phrases are used to compare and contrast. These include comparable to, in the same way, similarly, as o… http://ow.ly/Wy0t509zSS4

Emphasis on Italics – Italics are typica

Emphasis on Italics – Italics are typically used to show emphasis or to denote titles of stand-alone works. Different style guides have different rules about what to italicize. Here are some good general guidelines, but the most important thing is to stay consistent within your work. Titles of Works In most cases, you should italicize the titles of complete works, like books or movies. Some style guides, like APA format, prefer underlining titles. MLA format prefers ita… http://ow.ly/jyaV509ya2O

Pesky Homophones: Too, To And Two – The

Pesky Homophones: Too, To And Two – The three words too, to and two sound exactly alike but have three distinct usages! They are classic examples of what we refer to as homophones—words that are pronounced the same but have different meanings and spellings. They often end up in the wrong spot in written language as a result of an over-eager spellcheck program on your phone. Let’s examine which one fits in the right spot. Too As an adverb, too is used to describe somethi… http://ow.ly/lRbp509wrg9

When to Use Definite vs. Indefinite Arti

When to Use Definite vs. Indefinite Articles – Articles are a unique type of adjectives that indicate which noun (person, place, or thing) you’re talking about. The only definite article in English is the, and it refers to a specific noun. Indefinite articles (a or an) refer to nouns more generally. Indefinite Articles Indefinite articles refer to non-specific nouns. Think “I need a pen” or “I want an orange.” In both cases, we aren’t referring to a specific pen or oran… http://ow.ly/sAFJ509uMOA

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